Advertisement
Advertisement

New in Signal Transduction

JBC Podcasts icon Nuclear F-actin Formation and Reorganization upon Cell Spreading

In this episode of the JBC Paper of the Week Podcast, we interviewed Robert Grosse and Matthias Plessner about their paper on nuclear actin polymerization.

JBC Podcasts icon Quantitative Analysis of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase-Effector Coupling at Functionally Relevant Stimulus Levels

In this episode of the JBC Paper of the Week Podcast, we interviewed Adrian Whitty about his paper on RET receptor-effector coupling.

Cover of the JBC Thematic Series Cell Biology of G Protein SignalingThematic Minireview Series:
Cell Biology of G Protein Signaling

Coordinating Editor: Henrik G. Dohlman
 
 

SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION
IN PRESS

Deepa Subramanian, Wilawan Bunjobpol, Kanaga Sabapathy
First Published on May 27, 2015
Md. Mizanur Rahaman, Fabio G. Reinders, David Koes, Anh T. Nguyen, Stephanie M. Mutchler, Courtney Sparacino-Watkins, Roger A Alvarez, Megan P. Miller, Dongmei Cheng, Bill B. Chen, Edwin K. Jackson, Carlos J. Camacho, Adam C. Straub
First Published on May 22, 2015
Nicholas Artinian, Cheri Cloninger, Brent Holmes, Angelica Benavides-Serrato, Tariq Bashir, Joseph Gera
First Published on May 21, 2015
So Won Kim, Md. Hasanuzzaman, Munju Cho, Ye Rang Heo, Min-Jung Ryu, Na-Young Ha, Hyun June Park, Hyung-Yeon Park, Jae-Gook Shin
First Published on May 20, 2015
Cheng Deng, Haidi Chen, Na Yang, Yi Feng, Aaron J. W. Hsueh
First Published on May 20, 2015
Ivette Valencia-Sama, Yulei Zhao, Dulcie Lai, Helena J. Janse van Rensburg, Yawei Hao, Xiaolong Yang
First Published on May 20, 2015
Youngsil Choi, Mi-Jung Kwon, Yangmi Lim, Ji-Hye Yun, Weontae Lee, Eok-Soo Oh
First Published on May 15, 2015

Best of 2014

Lixia Jia, Mariangela Chisari, Mohammad H. Maktabi, Courtney Sobieski, Hao Zhou, Aaron M. Konopko, Brent R. Martin, Steven J. Mennerick, Kendall J. Blumer
February 28, 2014 The Journal of Biological Chemistry, 289, 6249-6257.

PAPERS OF THE WEEK

REPORTS

Katy J. Petherick, Owen J. L. Conway, Chido Mpamhanga, Simon A. Osborne, Ahmad Kamal, Barbara Saxty, Ian G. Ganley
First Published on Apr 01, 2015
Aaron C. Overland, Paul A. Insel
First Published on Mar 10, 2015

CLASSICS

The Barnard team used a radiolabeled benzodiazepine for detecting the GABA 
receptors after the purification process.
First Published on Nov 23, 2012
Yale Nemerson
Nicole Kresge, Robert D. Simoni, Robert L. Hill
First Published on Jun 24, 2011
Edmond H. Fischer
Nicole Kresge, Robert D. Simoni, Robert L. Hill
First Published on Jan 14, 2011
Yasutomi Nishizuka
Nicole Kresge, Robert D. Simoni, Robert L. Hill
First Published on Oct 22, 2010
Earl W. Davie
Nicole Kresge, Robert D. Simoni, Robert L. Hill
First Published on Nov 24, 2006
Martin Rodbell. Photo courtesy of the National Library of Medicine.
Nicole Kresge, Robert D. Simoni, Robert L. Hill
First Published on Jul 21, 2006
Line art representation of a quill pen. Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons: 
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Quill_%28PSF%29.png.
Nicole Kresge, Robert D. Simoni, Robert L. Hill
First Published on Apr 21, 2006
Sune Karl Bergström. Photo courtesy of the National Library of Medicine.
Nicole Kresge, Robert D. Simoni, Robert L. Hill
First Published on Feb 25, 2006
Alfred Gilman at the 1994 Nobel Prize awards.
Nicole Kresge, Robert D. Simoni, Robert L. Hill
First Published on Oct 28, 2005
Photo of Edwin G. Krebs, courtesy of the National Library of Medicine.
Nicole Kresge, Robert D. Simoni, Robert L. Hill
First Published on Oct 21, 2005
Photo courtesy of the National Library of Medicine.
Nicole Kresge, Robert D. Simoni, Robert L. Hill
First Published on Oct 14, 2005
Lowell and Mabel Hokin. Photo courtesy of Nature Publishing Group.
Nicole Kresge, Robert D. Simoni, Robert L. Hill
First Published on Jul 22, 2005
Christian A. Herter. Photo courtesy of the National Library of
Medicine.
Robert D. Simoni, Robert L. Hill, Martha Vaughan
First Published on Apr 19, 2002
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13

REFLECTIONS

*Jackie Corbin playing football for Tennessee Tech in 1961.*
Jackie Corbin
First Published on Dec 11, 2014
*Massimo Aloisi (courtesy of Alfredo Margreth).*
Ernesto Carafoli
First Published on Jul 08, 2013
In 1972, Roy Vagelos (/left/) was elected to the National Academy of 
Sciences.
Philip W. Majerus
First Published on Dec 17, 2010
*Ed Krebs (/left/) and Eddy Fischer (/right/) in 1992 upon hearing that they 
have been awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine.*
Philip Cohen
First Published on Jun 10, 2009
*General schematic representation of the elongation cycle of a translating 
ribosome.* Each cycle results in (i) elongation of a growing peptide chain by 
one amino acid residue (formation of one peptide bond), (ii) hydrolysis of 
two GTP molecules, (iii) entry of one molecule of aminoacyl (/Aa/)-tRNA into 
intersubunit channel, (iv) exit of one molecule of deacylated tRNA from the 
intersubunit channel, and (v) movement of mRNA chain by three nucleotides 
toward the 3′-end. Here, as well as in Figs. 3–5, ribosomal particles are 
shown in the orientation in which the small subunit (/yellow/) is on the top 
and the large subunit (/red/) is on the bottom. The head of the small subunit 
and the central protuberance of the large subunit are facing the viewer, with 
the L7/L12 stalk of the large subunit directed to the left. In this 
orientation, the bound L-like tRNAs must face the viewer by their external 
angles (“elbows”), as in reality they are facing the head of the small 
subunit; however, here, as well as in Figs. 3–5, for the sake of better 
discerning between the A and P site tRNAs, the external angles of their 
symbolical depictions (/green/) are shown to be drawn apart. The intersubunit 
channel accommodating the mRNA and tRNAs is traced by /dotted lines/. A and P 
are the tRNA-binding sites on the small subunit, and /a/, /p/, and /e/ are 
the binding sites for their 3′ termini, either acylated or deacylated, on 
the large subunit. (For the sake of better clarity, the subsites on the small 
subunit are designated by capital letters, A and P, as originally proposed 
and usually accepted (59, 94), whereas the large subunit subsites, which are 
localized within a small area of the PTC and nearby, are designated by 
lowercase italicized letters, /a/ and /p/, as proposed elsewhere (92).)
Alexander S. Spirin
First Published on May 05, 2009
Photo courtesy of Vanderbilt University.
Stanley Cohen
First Published on Aug 12, 2008
John H. Exton
First Published on Mar 31, 2008
Prospect of grant request being funded in relation to the originality of the 
research proposal.
Howard K. Schachman
First Published on Mar 10, 2006
Photo credit: Fran Pollner/NIH Catalyst, July-August 1997.
Ira Pastan
First Published on Mar 29, 2005
*Professor Hans Neurath (1909-2002).*
Earl W. Davie
First Published on Oct 21, 2003
John Jacob Abel
Joseph S. Fruton
First Published on Apr 17, 2002
The bicyclic cascade that regulates GS activity. Interrelationship between 
the cyclic interconversion of the regulatory protein between uridylylated 
(PII(UMP)4) and unuridylylated (PII) forms, and the cyclic interconversion of 
GS between adenylylated (GS(AMP)12) and unadenylylated forms, and the 
reciprocal control of these interconversions by l-glutamine (Gln) and 
α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). ATa and ATd denote the adenylylation and 
deadenylylation sites of adenylyltransferase, respectively; UTd and UTudenote 
the deuridylylation and uridylylation sites of uridylyltransferase, 
respectively. Reprinted with permission from Rhee et al. (Rhee, S. G., 
Chock, P. B., and Stadtman, E. R. (1985) in The Enzymology of 
Post-translational Modification ofProteins (Freedman, P. B., and Hawkins, 
H. C., eds) Vol. 2, pp. 273–297, Academic Press, New York).
Earl R. Stadtman
First Published on Oct 03, 2001
The bicyclic cascade that regulates GS activity. Interrelationship between 
the cyclic interconversion of the regulatory protein between uridylylated 
(PII(UMP)4) and unuridylylated (PII) forms, and the cyclic interconversion of 
GS between adenylylated (GS(AMP)12) and unadenylylated forms, and the 
reciprocal control of these interconversions by l-glutamine (Gln) and 
α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). ATa and ATd denote the adenylylation and 
deadenylylation sites of adenylyltransferase, respectively; UTd and UTudenote 
the deuridylylation and uridylylation sites of uridylyltransferase, 
respectively. Reprinted with permission from Rhee et al. (Rhee, S. G., 
Chock, P. B., and Stadtman, E. R. (1985) in The Enzymology of 
Post-translational Modification ofProteins (Freedman, P. B., and Hawkins, 
H. C., eds) Vol. 2, pp. 273–297, Academic Press, New York).
Earl R. Stadtman
First Published on Oct 03, 2001
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13

MINIREVIEWS

Byung Hak Ha, Elizabeth M. Morse, Benjamin E. Turk, Titus J. Boggon
First Published on Apr 08, 2015
Mikel Garcia-Marcos, Pradipta Ghosh, Marilyn G. Farquhar
First Published on Jan 20, 2015

Most Read
Last Two Months

Sharda Kumari, Susheel N. Chaurasia, Manasa K. Nayak, Ram L. Mallick, Debabrata Dash
First Published on Mar 31, 2015

MOST CITED

Chunli Yu, Yan Chen, Gary W. Cline, Dongyan Zhang, Haihong Zong, Yanlin Wang, Raynald Bergeron, Jason K. Kim, Samuel W. Cushman, Gregory J. Cooney, Bronwyn Atcheson, Morris F. White, Edward W. Kraegen, Gerald I. Shulman
First Published on Nov 14, 2002
Sudeepta Aggarwal, Nico Ghilardi, Ming-Hong Xie, Frederic J. de Sauvage, Austin L. Gurney
First Published on Nov 04, 2002